Enablers, Not Doers

How do you run effective Platform Engineering teams?

All organizations have Platform Engineering teams in one form or the other; these are centralized engineering teams providing building blocks for other engineering groups within the company. The customers for these teams are the internal engineers, not the end-users of the product.

For Platform Engineering teams to be effective, do not strongly couple them with the other engineering groups. Even though these are centralized engineering teams, they should operate in a decentralized manner. Platform Engineering teams should follow the mantra of Loosely coupled but strongly aligned with the other engineering teams. To achieve this, view Platform Engineering teams as enablers, not as doers.

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The build engineering team creates tools and resources so that any team in the organization can deploy their builds to production, i.e., the Build engineering team enables you to deploy builds using the tools they create; they do not deploy the build for you.

The performance engineering team creates tools and frameworks for you to identify performance bottlenecks, i.e., the performance engineering team enables you to identify performance bottlenecks using the tools they build; they do not identify performance bottlenecks for you.

The security engineering team creates tools and libraries for you to identify security loopholes, i.e., the security engineering team enables you to identify security holes using the tools they build; they do not identify security loopholes for you.

This is how organizations should mold and communicate the role of Platform Engineering teams. Positioning the Platform Engineering teams as doers instead of enablers makes them the bottleneck for other teams to get their work done.

Other teams rely on Platform Engineering teams for their success. You do not want them second-guessing whether the Platform Engineering teams are doing their job or not. They need to trust the Platform Engineering teams with their critical workloads. Without trust, everything breaks, leading to unnecessary back and forth, sapping the energy of all parties involved.

To build this culture of trust, Platform Engineering teams should focus on observability, performance, and stability.

Lack of observability creates anxiety. If the build engineering team does not give a dashboard where one can see the progress of builds, history of builds, and create alerts on build failure – teams would be anxious about their builds. They would bug the Build Engineering team on this, causing stress all around. Observability is a must for creating a culture of zero stress and anxiety.

Documentation is a subset of observability. Once the Platform Engineering team releases a tool or an API, others should be able to use them without intervention from the Platform Engineering team. To achieve this, Platform Engineering teams should focus on clear and concise documentation.

Since all teams use the tools and APIs of Platform Engineering teams, performance improvements have a multiplicative effect.

The build tool not working, brings the engineering org to a standstill. Login not working negatively affects all parts of the application. Hence, a keen focus on stability is a must. These are the foundations on which other engineering teams build their features.

Due to the nature of the work of Platform Engineering teams, consulting, guiding, and proliferation of best practices becomes part and parcel of the day to day responsibilities; this is understated, but Platform Engineering teams spend a significant chunk of their time on this. Look for ways to institutionalize these so that the Platform Engineering teams are engaged in their core work and not spending time on this. As discussed earlier, focussing on observability, performance, and stability goes a long way towards this.

Feature prioritization can become a challenge for Platform Engineering teams as everyone comes to them with feature requests. A simple yardstick to use is – If we do not release this functionality, is there a way for the requesting team to go about their work, albeit in a roundabout manner? If the answer is yes, then it is not a burning problem. If not, you need to figure out a way to get the feature out as soon as possible.

Platform Engineering teams should adopt a broad perspective when developing features. Do not develop features for a particular team. Think of how the feature relates to other teams and design it so that everyone in the organization can leverage the feature.

If you want to build a culture of speed and rapid iteration, viewing Platform Engineering teams as enablers and not as doers is critical.

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Image by Susbany from Pixabay

 

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