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Tag: Musings

The Source

I think the minute you have a backup plan, you’ve admitted you’re not going to succeed.

Elon Musk said so. Chew on this for sometime before you read the rest.

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I was not honest with the above. It was not Musk who made the statement but Elizabeth Holmes, at the peak of her popularity. It has been a hard fall for Elizabeth from then to now; she is now accused of fraud.

Did your opinion of the quote change with the source? Did you go from awe to retching?

I believe we give as much importance to the source of a quote as to the quote itself. We should be internalizing quotes and aphorisms by divorcing the source. A quote should be evaluated solely on its content, not who it came from. When we do not do this, the aura of the person shadows the import of the saying, reducing it to personality worship. The significance of the quote tends to get lost.

The act of viewing a quote objectively also acts like a shit umbrella against famous people getting away with baloney like the above from Holmes. If a successful person makes a statement, we take it at face value thinking if she says it, it must be true. We should guard ourselves against this attitude.

Internalizing a quote just on its content is not easy to do as we all love narrative fallacy, but it is worth trying. As with everything, we get better at it with practice.

Image credit: Ilyass SEDDOUG

Déjà Vu

You have been trying to solve a problem for quite some time; the solution appears to be elusive. As you grapple more with the problem, a seed of a solution germinates which sprouts into an answer. In hindsight, the resolution appears obvious. You kick yourself telling why did I not think of this sooner?

How many times has the above happened to you?

I believe almost everyone goes through these in life.

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One simple hack to get better and faster at problem solving is to backtrace through your thinking. Once you successfully arrive at a solution, replay your unsuccessful attempts and figure out what you could have tweaked in your thinking process to arrive at the answer faster.

High performance teams do post-mortem analysis after a critical issue. Members create RCA(root cause analysis) document which contains what went wrong, what could have been done to prevent the untoward incident from occurring and what are the steps to be taken to avoid a relapse. We should be applying the same steps to our thought process when we do not arrive at solutions on time; think of this as an RCA of your thinking process.

This simple trick I believe helps us in getting better and faster at problem-solving.

Image credit: Diego PH

On Writing

I have been writing for quite some time now. I started blogging as soon as I got out of college. I have been writing on and off since then, but in the last one year, I have been successful in maintaining a writing streak. I have always wanted to write regularly; it is only now that I have been successful at it. A significant impetus to the writing streak was the realization that I was becoming a passive consumer and not a producer. I am a voracious reader, and at one point, I realized that I was consuming stuff without putting out anything of my own. Off-late, I have been promoting my posts a bit more aggressively due to which I have received bouquets as well as brickbats. A couple of questions have come my way along the lines of how do you manage to write so regularly, where do you get the ideas from and some trepidations people go through when they want to express their opinion in public.

I write for myself; this might sound like a cliche with a lot of writers claiming so, but you need to start writing to get this. Writing is like having a structured conversation with oneself; it is therapeutic. It helps to bring clarity to a lot of ideas I have. It also helps me to develop a rubric for thinking and decision making which aids me at work as well as in my personal life. Every day I make tons of decisions, creating a framework for this helps me to evaluate the choices objectively and get better at it. Writing helps me to reinforce the process to make these decisions.

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One of the trepidations that most face when it comes to putting out their opinion in public is whether it is good enough, what will others think? Whenever I look at my past writings, I have a terrible feeling in my stomach. I can spot quite a bit of grammatical errors, half-baked ideas, and poorly constructed phrases. I am sure I will feel the same about this post in future. But, you get better by doing, not by not doing, hence, if I write more, I should get progressively better at it, at least, that is the hope. Seeing this from the lens of a journey rather than a destination helps. Ask yourself the question; what is more important to you? Is it your image in other’s eyes or your improvement? What do you prioritize?

What if I write something which I no longer believe to be true? It does not matter. If your views and thoughts are not constantly evolving, there is something wrong. If your beliefs are changing, it means that you are getting exposed to diverse ideas and opinions and you are continually updating your thoughts. A better way to put it is; strong opinions, loosely held. My writings are a reflection of my views at a particular point in time; they may very well change in the future. Wise people understand this.

Another common misconception everyone has is that one has to write something long and unique. Even I held this view earlier, but I have changed. I no longer believe that writings have to span pages to be effective. Shorter essays are equally palatable and powerful. Haikus, proverbs, and parables are some examples of short useful musings. Even if you voice something that someone has written before but color it in your perspective, it adds a lot of value.

How do I write?
I have a rough idea in mind. I draft that. I sleep over it for a couple of days, editing it now and then. I try to shorten it as much as possible nuking unnecessary words and sentences. When I feel I have been moderately successful in communicating the concept effectively, I publish it. After posting, I find numerous ways in which I could have done it better, but I have to draw the line somewhere.

I am writing this in the hope that I can enthuse others to start writing more often.

Blogs Versus Books

Long time back, in one of the social gatherings, someone asked me what do you do in your pastime? I said I read a lot. That person asked – What was the last book you read? I stumbled a bit and took a name. I realized that it had been quite a while since I read a book. Unbeknownst, I had gotten into the habit of reading blogs and articles online with social media and messaging boards acting as the source. There is always more than you can chew with articles touching a wide variety of subjects. Also, it feels a bit like going down a rabbit hole; one blog/tweet leads to another which leads to another and so on until you lose track of time.

I have been a voracious reader of books since my childhood. I got hooked onto online articles and blogs only during the later part of my life; this got me thinking about the difference between reading blogs versus books.

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Even though most books revolve around a core central idea, the author takes the pain to reinforce this with different thoughts and anecdotes. The author builds a structured case around the view and presents a lot of scenarios leading to the core idea. Reading blogs and articles in most cases feels like reading a summary of a concept or just one facet of it.

When you read a book, you are enjoying the journey whereas reading a blog feels more like focussing on the destination. Both have their place, but one should strike a balance between the two.

Pay The Price

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Obstacle racer Amelia Boone says that she is not able to devote enough time to friends and family due to the demands of her tough training regime. That is the price she pays for being on top of her sports.

In the movie HEAT, Robert De Niro says – “Don’t let yourself get attached to anything you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you feel the heat around the corner.” That is the price he pays for being a master thief.

Michael Mauboussin says his quest for knowledge means he misses out on latest series like Game Of Thrones. That is the price he pays for being a crème de la crème investor.

I feel one of the reasons why people give up something too soon or midway is they have not figured out the price they have to pay for doing it.

Everything that one does has a price. Sometimes it is implicit, sometimes not. Better to figure it out beforehand.

Oops, I did it again

It is a packed elevator. Occupants are rubbing shoulders. Stops at a floor. Door opens. A lady wants to get in but there is no room. Annoyance plays on her face. Elevator moves on.

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We all know that worrying over things that we cannot control is a pointless exercise. We are aware of the many cognitive biases that we have, we still fall prey to them. Why does this happen? There is a huge difference between knowing something and internalizing it.

Daniel Kahneman says that in spite of studying biases throughout his life, he is no better at avoiding them compared to others. Dan Ariely believes Kahneman was playing to the audience with that quote and we do get better at recognizing cognitive biases and sidestepping them.

Two simple practices that I find useful in becoming more aware of my emotions and biases:
1. Carrying out a daily audit. Every night, I go over circumstances that day where I believe I could have reacted better. Along with this, I also ruminate situations where my cognitive biases one-upped me.
2. Whenever I know that I am getting into an unpleasant situation, I keenly observe my emotions. This might be something as mundane as getting stuck in a traffic jam to dealing with an unpleasant situation.

I am not sure whether anyone will be able to completely eliminate these but I believe we can get incrementally better at it. Minuscule daily improvements compound to mammoth changes over a long time.

 

Luck

I read an interesting article by Richard Wiseman on luck, which I would highly encourage everyone to read. The gist of the article is that people make their own luck and being lucky is something that can be learned.

An excerpt from the article:

Lucky people generate their own good fortune via four basic principles. They are skilled at creating and noticing chance opportunities, make lucky decisions by listening to their intuition, create self-fulfilling prophesies via positive expectations, and adopt a resilient attitude that transforms bad luck into good.

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Patrick O’Shaughnessy, in his podcast “Invest like the best“, talks to interesting people. He mainly concentrates on investors who have made it big, but once in a while he also chats with people from other walks of life. A common theme that keeps repeating in his interviews is how these people jumped at opportunities which others had shunned, their optimism and an attitude that stresses on continuous learning and development. These qualities eerily match with what Richard Wiseman says makes one lucky.

In the recent Farnam Street podcast, behavioral economist Dan Ariely says the following – “I gamble with my time. I take risks, I do things that do not seem like the right things to do”.

Two of the most successful and rich people of our times, Bill Gates and Warren Buffett are gung-ho about the future. Bill Gates actively champions positive thinking and wants all of us to cultivate this.

Probably luck is not luck after all. I am sure it is more nuanced than this, but something to ponder about.

10 things you did not know about Vietnam

Sorry, could not help with the snarky title. We recently took a vacation to Vietnam and this is a collection of unconnected thoughts and observations about the country and our journey.

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During our travel, we visited Ho Chi Minh City, Da Nang, Hoi An, Hue, Hanoi and Halong Bay. In all these places, infrastructure was amazing, almost on par with western countries. In Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh city, there are abundant parks and public spaces. They are very well maintained too.

There are walking streets everywhere. Most of these are regular streets which get converted to pedestrian only movement during the night. You will spot umpteen eating and drinking options in these streets. These walking streets are not as scandalous as the ones in Thailand.

Food is a big part of the culture, street food is abundant. It is a paradise for non vegetarians, not so much if you are a vegetarian. Noodle soup(Pho) and banh mi are two of the most popular delicacies. Banh mi means bread in Vietnamese, usually it is sold stuffed with veggies and/or meat.  Banh mi is a relic of the French past like our Pav(Vada Pav). There is a version of noodle soup called hot pot which is cooked right on your table which is delicious. People watching seems to be a big thing, lots of cafes lined with chairs facing the street. I am in love with Vietnamese coffee, it is black coffee with condensed milk, tastes amazing.

Vietnamese seem to have a thing for “The North Face”. Fake North Face products abundant on the streets. Giving them company are Nike, Superdry and Under Armour. Adidas, Reebok and Puma are conspicuously absent.

Traffic is chaotic. Two wheelers zipping past everywhere breaking all rules. You can rent two wheelers in all the cities, which we did. There is neither license check nor passport deposit, it is a honour based system. Toyota is everywhere. We checked with a taxi driver as to why Toyota seems to be omnipresent. Since there are so many two wheelers, scratches and skirmishes are common it seems. Hence Vietnamese prefer Toyota which is easy to maintain and spare parts are economically priced.

Communication is a challenge. Google translate was a life saver. It was much easier to just type in translate and show to people.

Vietnam is blessed with abundant water, water bodies everywhere, in cities as well as countryside. From the 60th floor of Lotte tower in Hanoi, we could spot innumerable lakes.

Museums and historical places scream jingoism. Glorification of Vietnamese struggle against the French and Americans seem a bit in your face.

Vietnam seems to be on the path to becoming an economic powerhouse. Signs are everywhere, from the burgeoning constructions to commercial towers competing for the most number of floors title.

Vietnamese are a friendly lot, they try their best to make things happen for you. We have hardly had bad experiences with people apart from a parking attendant in Hanoi who lost his cool due to the language barrier.

All hotels including our room in the cruise had slippers as part of standard accessories which was new. Also, in some of the public toilets, you had to change your footwear to slippers present there, a nice hack to keep the toilets clean.

Indian cinema and tv shows seem to be very popular. Our van driver was glued to Telugu movie scenes on his phone and a taxi driver told us he is a big fan of Hindi movies.

Internal air transport is economical, couple of low cost carrier options.

Souvenirs and trinkets are sold everywhere. Propaganda posters are really cool. Vietnamese seem to have a soft corner for Tintin, various posters and fridge magnets of “Tintin in Vietnam” or “Tintin in Saigon”.

Vietnamese script is English with accents. A French person created the script for Vietnamese. Original Vietnamese script is long lost it seems.

Vietnamese seem to love kids, we had three toddlers in our group, they were greeted with chocolates and souvenirs by strangers almost everywhere.

From a cultural perspective, Vietnam and India share a lot in common. Vietnam has a rich cultural past, dating back centuries. In fact, at one point of time, Hinduism was the dominant religion in Vietnam.

While coming back, we took Malindo air. Malindo air was a pleasant surprise, friendly stewards, ample leg room and in flight meals.

When we told people that we are going to Vietnam, all asked us why and we did not have an answer. It was well worth it though.

Fighting change

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In my new workplace, I was assigned a brand new shiny MacBook. My first reaction was to ask for an Ubuntu laptop. My brain justified by giving several reasons, it is developer friendly, software that you run on a server runs as is in Ubuntu, etc. I was almost about to voice this opinion, but system two took over from system 1. It started asking questions along the lines of is this the reason you want an Ubuntu machine or are you just trying to avoid the unfamiliar? You have not used a Mac before and are you trying to run away from something new? The two debated for some time and settled on giving the Mac a chance. So far, the experience has been, and I am learning some cool things like using gestures for different actions, etc.

Whenever something new and unfamiliar comes across, the instinct for most of us is to fight it. Take a step back, analyze whether this is the primal part of the brain trying to fight against the unfamiliar or you have a valid reason not to.

A little extra effort

I was sauntering on Church Street and came across a used book store. It had been long since I had been to a physical book store, hence ventured in. I started browsing around. I have been wanting to read Shoe Dog for quite sometime, asked the proprietor did he have a used copy of the book. He answered in the negative and got back to whatever he was doing before. I continued my aimless browsing and got out.

Down the road, there was another used book store. Again got in and repeated the question. The person searched, said no, but he put a new copy of the book in my hand and said he can give me a 20% discount. I am sure he knew before hand that he did not have a used copy of the book, searching was just a ruse. I made the purchase.

We tend to neglect the impact of putting that little extra in. Sometimes all it takes is a little extra effort for a great outcome.